New projects created from Visual Studio templates contain default tile, splash screen, and store logo images that just contain an X in a box. These are designed to be so ugly that you feel utterly compelled to replace them.

Unfortunately, some developers forget to do this. Until recently, these weren’t actually checked by the Store certification process, thus we see some apps in the Windows Store that still contain the default Store logo:

The particular challenge with the Store logo (that’s referenced on the manifest editor’s Packaging tab and not the Application UI tab) is that you never see that graphic in the running app. It appears only in the Store after you’re onboarded the app, which is why we see some of them make it into the Store.

Fortunately, the Store certification process (and a version of the Windows App Certification Kit from November 2012 or later), will fail you if you’re still using the default images.

Save yourself the trouble, then, by making sure to double-check your square tile, wide tile, splash screen, and store logo graphics before uploading to the Store.

While you’re at it, be sure to give your app a more interesting background color than the default gray. Such things are so simple to change and make a huge difference in your Store presence.


This is something we saw with a number of early partners. In the app manifest, in the Application UI section of Visual Studio’s editor, there’s an option called Show name with a variety of options:

By default, this is set to “All logos” meaning that the value in the “Display name” field (also on the Application UI section), or the value in the “Short name” field, if given,  will appear on the lower left of a tile as shown here:

As you can see here, the display name/short name text is redundant with the app name that’s already on the tile. To remove it, select one of the other options in the Show name drop-down.

It’s a good thing to double-check before submitting an app to the Store. Having a name show on a tile when the graphic shows a name too won’t cause the app to fail certification, but it does look a little silly.

When you support live tiles, there are situations where you do want the name or a badge logo to appear on the tile, even though you don’t show the name for the default tile. For these purposes, use the branding attribute in the tile update XML. See Chapter 13 of Programming Windows 8 Apps with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, in the “Branding” section (page 585) for details.