I just finished publishing a body of content on unit testing for JavaScript in the context of Apache Cordova, including both command-line and Visual Studio interfaces. I had a lot of fun learning about the subject and finding ways to communicate a number of concepts. I also found a direct example of a slight difference between JS runtimes that can bite you, but I'll leave that for the articles themselves.

You can find it all on http://taco.visualstudio.com/, the docs site for the Visual Studio Tools for Apache Cordova, under the "Test" node. Here are the individual topics:

There are two other topics in that node that I'll be revising and/or integrating into the stuff above: Test Apache Cordova apps with Karma and Jasmine and Test Apache Cordova apps with Chutzpah.

I'd love to know what you think, as this material is easily the basis for a video course with Microsoft Virtual Academy as well.

In January I'll start diving into UI testing for mobile–should be fun!


Microsoft's Developer Division just hosted its second Connect(); event, which I suspect many of you have been following on http://www.visualstudio.com/connect2015.

I got to be in the heart of things this year. I've been temporarily managing the Visual Studio Blog while Radhika Tadinada, the PM who owns it, is out on maternity leave until about March enjoying her adorable little baby girl. For Connect();, this meant two things. First was managing the content for the VS blog itself, which included working closely with John Montgomery on posts like his news/announcement rollup. Second was that I coordinated the efforts of all the other blogs that are represented on the header menu on the blog site…and that was quite a few of them!

Anyway, I compiled a list of all the blogs that went out yesterday for Connect(); and wanted to share that here.

.NET
Announcing .NET Core and ASP.NET 5 RC
Entity Framework 7 RC1 Available

App Insights and HockeyApp
Introducing Mobile DevOps with Visual Studio Team Services and HockeyApp
Deep Diagnostics for Web Apps with Application Insights
Azure Diagnostics Integration with Application Insights

Apps for Windows
Vungle SDK for Windows 10 Released
November improvements in Dev Center: submission, promotion and developer agreement
Windows Bridge for iOS: Where we are and where we are headed

Azure and Azure SDK
Azure: The cloud for any app and every developer
Public preview of Azure Service Fabric
Public preview of Azure DevTest Labs
Announcing the Azure SDK 2.8 for .NET

Brian Harry
News from Connect(); 2015

C++
Announcing the VS GDB Debugger extension

OfficeDev
Introducing the Microsoft Graph

Visual Studio
News and Announcements at Connect(); //2015
Node.js Tools 1.1 for Visual Studio Released
Announcing the Intune App SDK

Visual Studio Code
Announcing Visual Studio Code Beta

Web Development
Announcing ASP.NET 5 Release Candidate 1

Visual Studio ALM
Getting Started with DevTest Lab for Azure
MacinCloud Visual Studio Team Services Build and Improvements to iOS Build Support
Announcing Public Preview for Visual Studio Team Services Code Search
Announcing the new Release Management service in Visual Studio Team Services
Subversion integration with Visual Studio Team Services
Announcing Public Preview of Visual Studio Marketplace
Announcing easy to use browser-based exploratory testing for Visual Studio Team Services
Git Credential Manager for Mac and Linux
Test Results in Build

Xamarin (I didn't have anything to do with this one, but it's referenced from the VS blog, so I’m including here)
Introducing Xamarin 4


Update: with Eric’s comment, we’ve worked out how to make SQLite work properly with Xamarin without playing versioning games. The instructions can be found on http://developer.xamarin.com/guides/cross-platform/xamarin-forms/windows/samples/#sqlite, with thanks to Craig Dunn. The short of it is that you want to add SQLite.net-PCL from NuGet, then separately add a reference to Microsoft Visual C++ 2013 Runtime.

We return you now to the original post…

 

The last few weeks I’ve been making significant revisions to a Xamarin project based on code review feedback. This project is part of a larger effort that we’ll be presenting in a couple MSDN Magazine articles starting in August.

One big chunk of work was cleaning up all my usage of async APIs, and properly structuring tasks+await to do background synchronization between the app’s backend and its local cache for offline use. The caching story will be a main section in Part 2 of the article, but the story of cleaning up the code is something I’ll write about here in a couple of posts.

The first bit of that story is my experience–or struggle–to find the right variant of SQLite to use in the app. As you might have experienced yourself, quite a few SQLite offerings show up when you do a search in Visual Studio’s NuGet package manager. In our project, I started with SQLite.Net-PCL, which looked pretty solid and is what one of the Xamarin samples itself used.

However, I ran into some difficulties (I don’t remember what, exactly) when I started trying to use the async SQLite APIs.
On Xamarin’s recommendation I switched to the most “official” variant, sqlite-net-pcl, which also pulls in SQLitePCL.raw_basic.0.7.1. Keep this version number in mind because it’s important here in a minute.

This combination worked just fine for Android and iOS projects, but generated a warning for Windows Phone: Some NuGet packages were installed using a target framework different from the current target framework and may need to be reinstalled. Packages affected: SQLitePCL.raw_basic.

This is because SQLitePCL.raw.basic is marked for Windows Phone 8.0 but not 8.1, which is what my Windows Phone project in the solution was targeting.

OK, fine, so I went to the NuGet package manager, saw an update for the 0.8 version of SQLitePCL.raw.basic, and installed that. No more warning but…damn…the app no longer ran on Windows Phone at all! Instead, the first attempt to access the database threw a System.TypeInitializationException, saying “The type initializer for ‘SQLitePCL.raw’ threw an exception.” The inner exception, System.IO.FileNotFoundException, had the message, “The specified module could not be found. (Exception from HRESULT: 0x8007007E).”

What’s confusing in this situation is that SQLitePCL.raw does not appear in the Windows Phone project’s references alongside sqlite-net, as it does in the Android and iOS projects. This is, from what I can see, because the Windows Phone version of sqlite-net does some auto-gen or the raw DLL or has pre-built versions in its own package, so a separate reference isn’t necessary. (If you know better, please comment.)

Still, those DLLs were right there in the package and I couldn’t for the life of me figure out why it couldn’t find them, so I resorted to the tried and true method of trying to repro the failure from scratch with a new project, where the default Windows Phone project targeted 8.0. I then added “SQLite-net PCL” to all the projects in the solution, which brought in the raw 0.7.1 dependency, tossed in a couple APIs calls to create and access the database, and gave it an F5. Cool, everything worked.

Next, I retargeted the Windows Phone project to 8.1 and F5’d again. Everything still worked, but I got the warning about SQLitePCL.raw.basic once again. Apparently it’s OK to ignore that one.

I then updated SQLitePCL.raw to the 0.8 version and boom–got the exception again, so clearly there’s an incompatibility or bug in the 0.8 version with Windows Phone 8.1.

Clearly, then, the solution is to altogether avoid using the 0.8 version with a WP8.1 target, and if you want to suppress the warning, open packages.config in the Windows Phone project and have the SQLitePCL.raw_basic line read as follows:

<package id=”SQLitePCL.raw_basic” version=”0.7.1″ targetFramework=”wp80″ requireReinstallation=”False” />


Many of you have probably seen this already–an article that I wrote (with contributions from my teammate, Mike Jones), for MSDN Magazine.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/dn879349.aspx

I expect to be writing for MSDN more because my larger team at Microsoft owns the content calendar now!