I know it’s been a while since I posted much on my blog here. The coding project I was engaged in at Microsoft took up much of time between January and March, and the focus on coding didn’t leave much time to write about said coding. The //build came along and I’ve been working on Visual Studio feature guides with our marketing team.

I also discovered, in the process of coming back to my blog and updating WordPress, that the MySQL database that you can get through an Azure account (where I host this site), has a 20MB limit on ClearDB’s free tier. While updating WordPress, which does database updates as well, the MySQL file exceeded that limit and so the database got set to read-only. This, of course, meant that the database couldn’t be updated which then got me stuck in the WordPress database update loop-of-death.

Having returned from //build last week (where I spent most of my time in the Visual Studio cross-platform development kiosk talking to developers about Cordova, Xamarin, the Universal Windows Platform, and cross-platform C++), I finally got this sorted out by deleting all the spam comments from the WordPress database to reduce the file size, after which the update worked and I can post again.

[Addendum: the spam comments continue to come in at a frightening pace! Fortunately, the akismet plugin for WordPress does a good job at catching them, and will supposedly auto-delete in 15 days. However, the sheet volume of spam (many of which are 1-2 pages long) and all of akismet’s metadata it saves for each one, generates quite a few MB of garbage data in the database. So I’m having to monitor all this more closely. I hope soon to migrate the whole DB to an Azure database with a much larger quota.]

Speaking of cross-platform development, two other pieces I worked on recently are summary topics for Visual Studio Application Lifecycle Management (ALM) features as they apply to Cordova and Xamarin projects. You can find those topics on the MSDN Library:

In the meantime, our coding project team has been writing up our learnings for MSDN Magazine, so you’ll see those articles later this summer. I’m working on cleaning up my Xamarin client code, which will be the focus of Part 2 of the article.

A few folks have asked, by the way, whether I’ll be updating Programming Windows Store Apps with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript for Windows 10 and the Universal Windows Platform. Because I’m no longer with the Windows team, I won’t have working hours to focus on that project. What I’m looking at, however, is moving to something of an open-authoring model. I’m hoping first to split the Windows 8.1 book into two parts. The first would be WinJS-focused and separate from Windows, as WinJS is now its own open-source library. The second part would be Windows apps using JavaScript without the WinJS stuff.

Then I can put the files on GitHub and invite contributions, serving more in the role of an editor than a writer, though I’d probably still write some. Anyway, let me know what you think of the idea!


2 Comments

  1. Guillaume Leborgne
    Posted May 9, 2015 at 9:21 am | Permalink

    Hi Kraig,

    Open sourcing the book is a great idea ! Maybe using Sphinx just like the ASP.Net team does with their documentation (http://docs.asp.net) ?

  2. Julian Atanasoae
    Posted June 23, 2015 at 6:23 am | Permalink

    Before you are tempted to upgrade your website database from ClearDB MySQL to a SQL Azure DB, beware that WordPress doesn’t like it that much. At one point there was a community project called Brandoo WordPress, which could be found in the Azure Websites Gallery, that worked with SQL Azure. Unfortunately, that project is not developed anymore, and it also does not support the latest version of WordPress. So, the best solution that is available at this point for you is creating a dedicated VM for hosting a MySQL server and then connecting your Azure web site to it.

    Here are more details:
    http://www.microsofttrends.com/2015/05/02/brandoo-and-wordpress-now-completely-broken-moved-back-to-mysql-on-ubuntu/

    http://azure.microsoft.com/blog/2014/09/02/create-your-own-dedicated-mysql-server-for-your-azure-websites/

    And here is proof that it works really well:

    http://www.microsofttrends.com/2015/05/19/mysql-running-on-azure-vm-a0-rock-solid-so-far/

    Also, I would love to write content if you open-source the content of your book. Please let me know if I can do anything for you.