Similar to my previous post, but perhaps not quite as fun, is an account from Fighter: The True Story of the Battle of Britain, by Len Deighton, which I just finished.

Any comparison of the Merlin engine [as used in the RAF Spitfire and Hurricanes] and the Daimler-Benz DB 601A [as used in Messerschmidt Bf109’s] must begin by mentioning the latter’s fuel-injection system. …

Fuel injection, which puts a measured amount of fuel into each cylinder according to temperature and engine speed, etc., was demonstrably superior to the carburetors that the Merlins used. Carburetors are, at best, subject to the changes of temperature that air combat inevitably brings. At worst they bring a risk of freezing or catching fire. And with such large, high-performance engines, the carburetor system seldom delivers exactly the same amount of fuel simultaneously to each cylinder. Worst of all, the carburetor was subject to the centrifugal effect, so that it starved, and missed a beat or two, as it went into a dive.

The RAF pilots learned how to half-roll before diving, so that fuel from the carburetor was thrown into the engine instead of out of it, but in battle this could be a dangerous time-wasting necessity.


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