I completely forgot to post here that I've started doing a weekly Facebook Live session on the Ananda Music page, https://www.facebook.com/anandamusic1. Sessions happen Wednesdays, 9am PDT (or PST as soon as it changes). Each week I'm exploring a piece of music written by Swami Kriyananda, which each serve as antidotes to specific negative emotions in the kind of energy and consciousness expressed, and the way the music resonates with the spinal centers of chakras. Something I've been working with for the past 20 years! Find our more on anandamusic.org/antidotes.


It's been quite a while since I wrote a longer article for my collection here, as my energies have been so focused on Microsoft-related work the past few years. (Which reminds me that I should post some of that work, too!).

Be that as it may, I just posted this one:

A Morning's Mnemonic Exercise – During a morning walk, I had a long stream of distinct thoughts and ideas that I wanted to remember when I got back home. Because I don't like to exercise while carrying a phone, voice recorder, or notepad, I utilized mnemonic techniques to create very short mnemonic, H3M2 SPIES, with which I was able to remember a series of distinct keywords: history, hieroglyphs, house, mnemonics, meditation, seclusion, projection, identity expansion, and scheduling. Those keywords, in turn, helped me remember the distinct thoughts that I wanted to remember. I found this process of creating a heavily-encoded term that contained a series of keywords that were themselves an encoding of my thoughts. In this article I share the whole thinking process that occurred that morning.



https://www.nbcnews.com/think/opinion/too-much-stress-can-make-you-physically-ill-researchers-now-ncna839371

Given the decades of reporting around the negative health effects of stress, it should be a foregone conclusion that stress can certainly make you ill. The subtitle "Researchers may now know why" caught my attention, because it would seem that the cause-and-effect between stress and illness has been well understood for a long time.

What the report here discusses, though, is a recent study on the interaction of the immune system and nervous system.The study specifically focuses on mast cells, a type of immune cell. When they become overloaded, they "switch from being protective to actually pathogenic."

The research, of course, is focused on a pharmaceutical answer for this behavior. Needless to say, such drugs, if they are developed, will certainly have side effects and will demand a premium given the pervasiveness of stress. In contrast, the tools that I provide in Solving Stress are already available to you for free!

 



Cover_SolvingStressOn Thursday, Dec 7th, 7:00-8:30pm, I'll be giving an online webinar on my new book Solving Stress: The Power to Remain Cool and Calm Amidst Chaos. Registration is through https://anandauniversity.org/event/2017-12-07-satyaki-kraig-brockschmidt/. 

The normal cost for the webinar is $20, but you're invited to attend for free! Just use the coupon code comp-04499-kb at checkout for a 100% discount.

Hope to see you there.


With Solving Stress set to be released on Oct 27th, 2017, we're looking for people who can write a review on Friday or shortly thereafter. Could you help out? Email me via kraig (at) kraigbrockschmidt.com and I'll send you the interior PDF for reference.

https://smile.amazon.com/Solving-Stress-Power-Remain-Chaos/dp/1565893182/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1508705820&sr=8-1&keywords=solving+stress

Thank you!


My direct team at Microsoft, which owns content for Visual Studio (pretty much everything you see under https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/visualstudio/) has a new opening for a Content Developer! All the details are on the Microsoft Careers site for job ID 286233. This posting is for a junior position, as the experience bar is set at only 2 years of software-related work, even if it's not directly in content.

What is a Content Developer? Well, we are responsible for the Visual Studio documentation, but content also includes working on videos, sample code, and anything else that helps developers understand how to be productive with Visual Studio and other related tools (I handle the NuGet docs too, for example).

Perhaps this doesn't sound as glamorous as writing code, but consider this: the primary factor today in the adoption of a technology is content, not features. Knowing this, us content developers strive to make that content experience the best it can be because it has so much impact on the success of the products. As Miguel de lcaza tweeted, "When I ask myself "what would have the most impact today?" I sit down and write documentation."

So come join us and have that impact yourself. You can apply directly, of course, but also feel free to contact me directly for more, including @kraigbro on Twitter.


It's been some years since I got an email related to COM and OLE, and in this case it was Lun Ui of bamboorose.com who identified a bug in the iclass.cpp files of the Cosmo Server implementation that caused a failure. Specifically:

 

STDMETHODIMP_(ULONG) CFigureClassFactory::Release(void)

    {

    if (0 ==–m_cRef)  // BUG: should be !=

        return m_cRef;

 

    delete this;

    return 0;

    }

 

Thanks, Lun!

 


Among other extracurricular projects, I'm in the final stages of a new non-tech book called Solving Stress: The Power to Remain Calm and Cool amid Chaos, to be published later this year from Crystal Clarity, Publishers (cover design below). Unlike many books on stress reduction, this one goes to the heart of why were experience stress in the first place and looks at solutions from that standpoint, providing then some very direct and effective exercises—one’s I’ve personally used for many years.

I'm now specifically looking for reviewers who would be willing to write a supportive testimonial. For obvious reasons, I'm especially interested in those of you who have meaningful credentials that look good on the tag line of the testimonial. For example, higher degrees, books that you've authored, some standing in your industry or profession, etc.

If this is something you'd be willing to do, let me know via the Contact page and I'll get a PDF to you. I would need the testimonial by end of June, but don't worry, the book is only 138 pages which includes filler pages and a number of illustrations, so it's a reasonably short read!

cover-small